Ornery Arrington on Personalized News

streamyI can’t get enough of how Michael Arrington, at TechCrunch, rags on personalized new sites. I love it. Talking about the newest venture to join the hunt for a killer solution to online news, Arrington writes of Streamy, “It’s pretty and extremely well thought-out, but it’s not clear that it does anything new enough to grab people’s attention.” Plus, “It is well designed, has lots of intelligent features, and is almost sure to drop into obscurity immediately after launch.” What a guy!

For now, I’ll withhold real judgment—especially of the claims made here—till I’ve had a chance to check out the private beta, to which I’ve requested an invitation.

Meantime, I’m impressed with the social networking and what they call “filters,” which are essentially substance- and source-based ways browse, and subscribe to, kinds of content, by keyword and original author, respectively. Ideally, that would mean that someone could set up his personalized page to pull in everything Arrington says about, say, “personalized news.” The trick, then, is how social networking brings the virus to the filter. Your friend’s becomes your filter and then it becomes my filter; my filter becomes yours, your friend’s, his friend’s, and so on.

Note that amateurs don’t have to control these filters either. Arrington could promote his own, using them to help him slice up his content along different lines, potentially overlapping lines, and push it out Streamy readers of news, if there ever are any. Or these filters could allow someone to become an editor, much the way Scoble acts as an editor (choosing the news) with what he calls his link blog. If I were running Streamy, I’d be thinking about how I could allow users to monetize their filters. They are, after all, just platforms for subscriptions. Find a way to allow an expert on some tricky topic like global warming sell you his daily digest of the best reading on climate change. He could write his own original material as well, of course, and include it in his filter.

I agree with Arrington that integrating IM is smart, and integrating the ability to drag and drop stories is super smart. I wonder how popular it will become for sites to integrate IM. Will the New York Times have it some day? Will espn.com? It seems to make sense to distribute IM over virtual locations rather than keep it all cooped up in one place. If I were running meebo, I’d be thinking about how I could build a proprietary web-based IM client just for the New York Times. (From what I can tell, Jake Jarvis has tried to turn meebo into a Facebook app. I signed up, but got an error: “There are still a few kinks Facebook and the makers of Meebo are trying to iron out….”) I love meebo almost as much as Arrington’s orneriness.

Here’s the screencast of Streamy:

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