Archive for the 'campaign 2008' Category

Citizen Journalism Milestone

There isn’t a better account of all sides of an episode—any episode—of this “uncharted” thing Jay Rosen calls “citizen journalism.” Superlative.

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Digg Adds Depth

Digg just added social networking to its position as the leading player in submit-and-vote news! Yes, Digg added the second component of networked news to the first.

I’m not sure enough many people will have enough friends to end up caring so much more about what they think about the news than what the universe of diggers thinks about the news. I, for one, as a twenty-something workaday guy, just don’t know enough people who use Digg to slurp up their news efficiently.

But maybe there are fifteen-year-olds who use Digg to get all their news. And maybe there are enough who have lots of other friends who use Digg similarly. If so, the submit-and-vote version of the first component of networked news could be on its way.

Many people, including me, don’t use Digg because its content—often dominated, they say, by upper-middle class geeky white dudes—just doesn’t cut it. I’ll stick with hours upon hours in front of google reader, backed up by aideRSS, of course. But with networks of friends, like-minded intellectuals, no doubt, Digg could really scratch my itch for content on the impending collapse of the dollar or Barack Obama’s position on chatting with foreign leaders or this conference I want to go to badly. (They say there’s so little room! They say Dave Winer may show!)

Anyhow, when are we going to be able to digg stories from outside digg.com? When am I going to install on my facebook profile a digg application, in which I can choose to see everyone’s diggs, just my friends’ diggs, just diggs of certain topics, just my diggs going back through history, etc.? When, indeed, am I going to be able to vote from facebook? Stick an ad in your widget and be done with it, Mr. Rose, who’s a near-hero of mine, for his lack of technical skills, mostly. (He paid a guy—someone else, someone who could code—ten bucks an hour to develop the site.)

PS. Mr. Cohn, toss me an invitation to the conference you and Mr. Jarvis are doing God’s, or at least the Republic’s, work to organize! And ask the top diggers whether they think, or under what conditions, they think their role could shrink because people like me would shift our attention away from the Digg homepage to our own friend-centered niches by way of Digg’s bringing on the second component of networked news!

Breaking Content, Building Conversation

Deep down, what makes the new kind of debate from the Huffington Post, Slate, and Yahoo! actually really exciting is the extent to which it represents the third component of networked news.

What, again, is the third component of networked news? It’s a data-driven network of the people and the issues in the news.

Although very limited in scale, this example of being able to slice and dice a stodgy debate is amazingly powerful. Jarvis knows it. He groks how this means a “conversation”—a free-flowing exchange of information among people along a topic or around some substance of interest to everyone involved, both the speakers or writers and the listeners or readers. As I’ve noted before, I think Jarvis also, at some level, gets the importance of structuring the news around the people who are in it and who consume it and interact with it.

That’s what this is. Once the candidates have had their chances, we listeners get to pull apart their interviews, re-arrange them, and piece together a conversation, organized by issue. We can ignore candidates and focus on others. We can focus on Iraq, or maybe even withdrawal from Iraq, or we can weave in and out of interrelated topics, like, say, security and civil rights or single-payer health care and taxes, comparing each candidate’s self-consistency and comparing them all to one another. (I’m for security and civil rights and single-payer health care and taxes.)

This is awesome. Huffington Post is blowing up. For realz.

To bring in the first two components of networked news, HuffPo and co would have to give us the tools to weave in our own video clips and then let us share them with one another as variously trusting members of a community.

Let me juxtapose my own counterarguments to a windbag’s dissembling. Or let me loose some praise on another candidate’s courage. For that matter, let me juxatpose my praise for a candidate’s courage with another citizen’s attack on that same candidate’s cowardice. Let us argue with one another—and do it alongside the evidence.

And then let us, users and consumers, mixers and contributors, define relationships among one another. Let us grow our relationships. Let me read some smart midwesterner’s opinions on farm subsidies and then let me subscribe only to his agriculture-related content. Or let me take a wide-angle view of the network of conversations we citizens are having. Let me find out how many people really care about extraterritorial rendition, or let me get a sense of who wants big government to let them be. Let me check out which clips are the most viewed or most mashed-up.

That would be awesome.


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