Archive for the 'networked nwews' Category

The trend is your friend (@vctips)

“…demonstrate how a market is or will be growing in alignment with your business. timing is everything.”

http://twitter.com/vctips/statuses/899488783

And so I say this: The concept of “following” made popular by twitter and friendfeed is an increasingly natural concept for users. Friendfeed has pushed the boundaries with its “hide” feature, allowing users to personalize the flow of information from their friends.

It’s time to expand beyond the notion of following friends and merge it with subscribing to feeds in general. The market for web apps where we “follow” and control the stream of information that’s most interesting to us is growing. It’s time to get ahead of the curve and get serious about following the news, personalized.

Breaking Content, Building Conversation

Deep down, what makes the new kind of debate from the Huffington Post, Slate, and Yahoo! actually really exciting is the extent to which it represents the third component of networked news.

What, again, is the third component of networked news? It’s a data-driven network of the people and the issues in the news.

Although very limited in scale, this example of being able to slice and dice a stodgy debate is amazingly powerful. Jarvis knows it. He groks how this means a “conversation”—a free-flowing exchange of information among people along a topic or around some substance of interest to everyone involved, both the speakers or writers and the listeners or readers. As I’ve noted before, I think Jarvis also, at some level, gets the importance of structuring the news around the people who are in it and who consume it and interact with it.

That’s what this is. Once the candidates have had their chances, we listeners get to pull apart their interviews, re-arrange them, and piece together a conversation, organized by issue. We can ignore candidates and focus on others. We can focus on Iraq, or maybe even withdrawal from Iraq, or we can weave in and out of interrelated topics, like, say, security and civil rights or single-payer health care and taxes, comparing each candidate’s self-consistency and comparing them all to one another. (I’m for security and civil rights and single-payer health care and taxes.)

This is awesome. Huffington Post is blowing up. For realz.

To bring in the first two components of networked news, HuffPo and co would have to give us the tools to weave in our own video clips and then let us share them with one another as variously trusting members of a community.

Let me juxtapose my own counterarguments to a windbag’s dissembling. Or let me loose some praise on another candidate’s courage. For that matter, let me juxatpose my praise for a candidate’s courage with another citizen’s attack on that same candidate’s cowardice. Let us argue with one another—and do it alongside the evidence.

And then let us, users and consumers, mixers and contributors, define relationships among one another. Let us grow our relationships. Let me read some smart midwesterner’s opinions on farm subsidies and then let me subscribe only to his agriculture-related content. Or let me take a wide-angle view of the network of conversations we citizens are having. Let me find out how many people really care about extraterritorial rendition, or let me get a sense of who wants big government to let them be. Let me check out which clips are the most viewed or most mashed-up.

That would be awesome.

News Graph?

Mark Zuckerberg once upon a time extolled facebook and told us about this thing called a “social graph.” Bernard Lunn has just talked about an “innovation graph.”

What about a “news graph”? Hubs and spokes—call them nodes and bridges.

Nodes are the people who are the subjects of the news. Like Karl Rove or Paris Hilton or Chuck Prince. Maybe nodes can also be groups of people acting as a single agent. Like the 100th Congress or the Supreme Court or maybe even something really big like Disney Corp.

Bridges are the news issues connecting the people to whom they are relevant. Here, the bridges have substance apart from mere connection. It would be like a social graph having connections indicating different kinds of friendship—a solid line for a great friend maybe, and a dashd line for a business acquaintance. Think of bridges like tags, just like those you might in delicious. You find a piece of news, which comes in the form of a newspaper article or a blog post, for example, and you assign issue-tags to it. Then, in turn, you assign that article or post to the people-nodes whom it discusses. The issue-tags flow through the article to the people-nodes to which the article or post is assigned; the pieces of news fall out of this picture of the news graph.

When people-nodes have issue-tags thus associated with them, we can indicate when certain people-nodes share certain issue-tags. If we represent those shared characteristics with bridges that connect the people-nodes, we’re graphing the people in the news and the substantive issues that bind them all up into the story of the world at some slice in time.

Just note once more how the pieces of the new—the bits of content, as I call them—fall away and liberate the news and the people and issues it comprises from the narrow confines created by the printing press and furthered by HTML. (Check out Jarvis’s more than mildly inspiring post.) This kind of news graph would, at long last, make the bits of content contigent on the people and the issues they discuss. It’s the elegant organization for news.

This is, by the way, the third component of networked news. This is the data-driven network of the people and the issues in the news.


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